10 Bad Photography Habits You Need To Quit Today

workshop attendee by alan ranger

 

It’s easy to fall into bad habits when you’re starting out, and it can be even easier to allow yourself to become wrapped up in these habits for the long term. It happens to us all, but it’s important to address these habits early on to avoid any embarrassing mishaps in the future.

1. Hesitation – It’s important not to doubt yourself because hesitating for too long can cause you to miss the perfect shot. Be confident and take the shot.

2. Getting Lazy with White Balance – It’s amazing how many people don’t know the importance of white balance or even how to use it. It’s vitally important to adjust your white balance throughout the day.

3. Chimping – This is a very common term that describes the action of reviewing pictures on the LCD, which may not seem like a bad habit and is actually good to check and double check exposure, sharpness and depth of field, but also think about how many shots you’re missing while you’re staring at the screen all the time.

4. Not Triple Checking – Have you ever arrived at your shoot location and only then discovered that one or more essential pieces of equipment are missing? Avoid this devastating mishap by getting into a good habit of checking everything twice, or even three times.

5. Standing Still – Playing stuck in the mud is one of the worst ways to limit your creativity. Instead of shooting a scene from just one perspective, get into the good habit of moving around the location and make sure that you don’t miss your perfect shot.

6. Thinking You’ll “Fix It Later” – It’s easy to get caught up in the shoot and think that you can simply fix that stray hair in post-production, but do you really want to spend hours on the computer editing dozens of photos because of one pesky stray hair?

7. Lens Hood-Not Using it – This one happens far too many times. The lens hood is designed to do create shade in front of the lens to avoid glare.

8. Reusing the Same Settings – If you’re always using the same old camera settings you’re going to end up with a selection of images that all look hauntingly similar.  If you’re using those settings because that’s what you’re comfortable with, it’s time to dig out your manual and find out what your equipment is capable of.

9. Using the Same Lens – Carrying around more than one lens can be a bit of a pain, but using the same lens for all of you shots will greatly limit your possibilities. Getting together a good team of lenses will give you variety.

10. Shoot and Hope – We’ve all been guilty at some stage or another, clicking away and hoping that when you get home you’ll find something you can work with. But, how can you ever know how you got that fantastic shot?

I may not be able to stop you biting your nails, but I can certainly do my best to ensure that you are exhibiting good photography etiquette.