Winter Wonderland

Road to the heaven... by Mickael Dailly

The snow gods have spoken and many are riding the perfect powder waves, while others are stuck at home, dreading the negative temperatures.   This year we are hearing terms like “Bomb Cyclone” and “Bomogenesis” which both sound ridiculous and scary at the same time.  However, that being said, now is the perfect time to get out and capture your winter wonderland shot!

Here are some winter photo ideas-

1. Capturing Early morning fog

Taking a walk through early morning fog, can have you in suspense, constantly looking over your shoulder for that eerie presence.   Fog has a unique quality of suspended weightlessness but during the winter months it can cause a loss in barrings, leaving you floating, lost in the sea of pearly white iridescence.

 

Mystery by Evelyne Schulte
Mystery by Evelyne Schulte

 

Blue Fog I by Mary Ann Reilly
Blue Fog I by Mary Ann Reilly

 

2. Morning and evening glow

Capturing the light before, during and after sunrise or sunset can have a dramatic effect on your image.  Take advantage of blue and golden hours of the day to enhance your image.  Blue hour happens before sunrise and after sunset, your images will take on a bluish tone.  Golden hour takes place right after a sunrise and right before the sun goes down, your images will take on gold and pink tones.

 

Sunrise In the Tetons by Nancy Richard
Sunrise In the Tetons by Nancy Richard

 

Last winter revisited.. by Heather Mellon
Last winter revisited.. by Heather Mellon

 

Winter Sunset by Mandy Keller
Winter Sunset by Mandy Keller

 

Sunset At 2PM I by Peter Yeung
Sunset At 2PM I by Peter Yeung

 

3. Frozen water

Water takes a center stage in winter, from frozen waterfalls like Niagara, to lakes and even puddles.  Don’t forget to capture icicles found in nature or clinging to your very home.  There is an abundance of these ice daggers and they can be found practically everywhere.  Try pairing your icicle with lights to capture some gleaming shots!

 

Frozen puddle. by Joshua Lewis
Frozen puddle. by Joshua Lewis

 

Evening icicles by Jeff MacLeod
Evening icicles by Jeff MacLeod

 

Taughannock Falls by Peter Roome
Taughannock Falls by Peter Roome

 

4. Winter Macros

Frostbite doesn’t sound as pretty as it looks.  Search out plant life or urban textures that have been frozen in time.  Macros are lovely with a little frost.

 

Flower in Frost by Nicky Pearce
Flower in Frost by Nicky Pearce

 

frost by JoAnn Jurgens
frost by JoAnn Jurgens

 

Barb on barbs by James Lyon
Barb on barbs by James Lyon

 

5. Falling Snow

Fresh falling snow, high in the mountains, dancing slowly to the ground, is a serene photo opportunity.  But a ferocious blizzard wiping all traces of life, only leaving impassable drifts in its place, can be a dangerous and beautiful shot too.

 

Untitled by Shane Welch
Untitled by Shane Welch

 

Let it snow by Karan Kauchhur
Let it snow by Karan Kauchhur

 

6. trees in winter

There is just something about trees dusted in white that is so pure and speaks “winter.”  A forest or your neighborhood park will have plenty of perfect angles to capture.

 

Frost by abram deyo
Frost by abram deyo

 

December by Evelyne Schulte
December by Evelyne Schulte

 

Poplar wood by Roberto Pagani
Poplar wood by Roberto Pagani

 

Winter photography can be fun, exhausting, and difficult.  While photographing snow and fog, remember that all that extra reflecting light will trick your meter and you will want to utilize positive exposure compensation.  Also take in to account that snow will take on a bluish tone and if this is not your intention, finding white balance is key to capturing a more natural shot.  It is also helpful to take along a lens hood if you want to reduce or eliminate lens flare.

 

Road to the heaven... by Mickael Dailly
Road to the heaven… by Mickael Dailly

 

Flip by Martin Grønvold Bøe
Flip by Martin Grønvold Bøe

 

Approach winter weather with caution. Always tell someone where your going and dress accordingly.  Some helpful tips to remember- Batteries drain faster in cold weather, so always bring extra and wear them closer to your skin , your body temperature will help maintain their full power.  Be wary of condensation getting into the body of your camera when changing lenses.  It’s nice to take a camera bag along to protect your gear.  When you’re done for the day, before you go inside, place your camera in a air tight plastic bag like a zip lock.  This will ensure that when your camera warms up that the condensation stays out.

The only two things left worth mentioning, are have fun and when you’ve got your perfect shot(s), enter our Winter Landscape and Adventure photo contests to win some pretty amazing prizes!