Weird mossy patch in the Antiplano

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Uploaded 7 Jan 2009 — 50 favorites
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© Michel González Brun
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  • Weird mossy patch in the Antiplano
Photo Info
UploadedJanuary 7, 2009
TakenJune 3, 2007
MakeCanon
ModelCanon EOS 350D DIGITAL
Exposure1/250 sec at f/20
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length18 mm
ISO800
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The weird mossy patch is actually called a Yareta (Llarota in Spanish). It is a tiny flowering plant in the family Apiaceae native to South America, occurring in the Puna grasslands of the Andes in Peru, Bolivia, the north of Chile and the west of Argentina at between 3200 and 4500 metres altitude, this was taken in Bolivia's Antiplano. The plant grows in a very compact way in order to reduce heat losses and very close to ground level where air temperature is one or two degrees Celsius higher than the mean air temperature, this is due to the longwave radiation re-radiated by the soil. The plant grows at a rate of approximately one millimeter per year. Many yaretas are over 3,000 years old.

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