Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue

Uploaded 2 Mar 2010 — 2 favorites
Spotlight This! Enter Shoot Out
Login Required

To add items to your favorites you must login.

Already have a JPG account?

Login

Need to create a JPG account?

Signup
Cancel
JPG+ Required

Collections are a JPG+ feature. You must be a JPG+ member to create new collections and to add photos to collections.

Sign up for JPG+ to start using collections now!

© JamesHarmon McQuilkin
Views 28
Likes 0
Favorites 2
Comments 4
Would you like to also give a props comment to the photographer?
All dislikes require a comment. Please tell us why you do not like this photo.

More of JamesHarmon McQuilkin's Photos

  • Raising Cain
  • Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue
  • Finding A Way (Between The Shadows)
  • Darkest Before The Dawn (And Even After)
Photo Info
UploadedMarch 2, 2010
TakenFebruary 18, 2010
MakeSony
ModelDSC-R1
Exposure1/125 sec at f/5.6
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length23.4 mm
ISO400
Categories
No categories yet.

Similar photos

  • Submerged
  • Castle Walls
  • Crooked
  • Interior

Q: Where can I find a free guide for pleasing Blur Technique.

A: Do you know?

Photo license: © All rights reserved

An interesting marriage of architecture.
Newark, NJ

About the Influence and Origin of this style:
The Ionic order came from eastern Greece, where its origins are entwined with the similar but little known Aeolic order. It is distinguished by slender, fluted pillars with a large base and two opposed volutes (also called scrolls) in the echinus of the capital. The echinus itself is decorated with an egg-and-dart motif. The Ionic shaft comes with four more flutes than the Doric counterpart (totalling 24). The Ionic base has two convex moldings called tori which are separated by a scotia.

The Ionic order is also marked by an entasis, a curved tapering in the column shaft. A column of the ionic order is nine or lower diameters. The shaft itself is eight diameters high. The architrave of the entablature commonly consists of three stepped bands (fasciae). The frieze comes without the Doric triglyph and metope. The frieze sometimes comes with a continuous ornament such as carved figures.

4 responses

  • Jüri Vissak

    Jüri Vissak gave props (2 Mar 2010):

    Cool find! Art is everywhere.

  • Christopher J Chalk

    Christopher J Chalk gave props (2 Mar 2010):

    Great angle, love the old against the new!

  • Leslie Hunziker

    Leslie Hunziker   gave props (2 Mar 2010):

    fantastic building!

  • Bruce Miller

    Bruce Miller (Deleted) gave props (3 Mar 2010):

    Architipical of 19th century American architecture

To add your comment, Log in or sign up!

Please Login or Sign Up

You must be logged in to enter photos into JPG Shoot Out contests.
Login or Sign Up