Basswood (DHOL) musician

Uploaded 1 Jun 2010
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© Syed Kazmi Yasir
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Photo Info
UploadedJune 1, 2010
MakeNikon
ModelCOOLPIX L4
Exposure1/125 sec at f/2.8
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length6.3 mm
ISO50

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Q: I've noticed that five of my uploads have " Hot" in front of the caption. Why are they caterogized that way ?

A: Do you know?

Photo license: © All rights reserved

The music of Pakistan includes diverse elements ranging from music from various parts of South Asia as well as Central Asian, Persian, Turkish, Arabic and modern day American music are all influences. With these multiple influences, Pakistani music has emerged as a "fusion" of these elements, to form a distinctly Pakistani sound.
The dhol, is a drum (a percussion musical instrument) widely used in the Subcontinent, especially the Punjab region, and especially among the Sikhs of East Punjab and also in Pakistani Punjab region.

Apart from Punjab, Dhol has been adapted into the music of other regions throughout South Asia and abroad including the Assam Valley (during Assam's Bihu festival), Gujarat, Rajasthan, Sindh and Maharashtra. It is very popular in modern Punjabi music.

The dhol is a drum that dates back to the 15th century. It was probably introduced to the Indian subcontinent via the Persian drum type dohol (duhul). The evidence for this is found in Ain-i-Akbari, which describes the use of duhul in the orchestra of the Mogul emperor Akbar. The Indo-Aryan word "dhol" appears in print around 1800 in the treatise Sangitasara.

The dhol is most commonly associated with Punjabi music and dance. It was used in war by the Sikhs and later to celebrate successful harvests by Jatt landowners. This drum became the ground roots of modern Bhangra music.

The dhol is a double-sided barrel drum (straight barrels also exist) played mostly as an accompanying instrument in regional music forms. In Qawwali music, the term dhol is used to describe a similar, but smaller drum used with the smaller tabla, as a replacement for the left hand tabla drum. The typical sizes of the drum vary slightly from region to region.

In Punjab, the dhol remains large and bulky to produce the preferred loud bass. In other regions, dhols can be found in varying shapes and sizes and made with different woods and materials (fiber glass, Steel, Plastic). The drum consists of a wooden barrel with animal hide or synthetic skin stretched over its open ends, covering them completely. These skins can be stretched or loosened with a tightening mechanism made up of either interwoven ropes, or nuts and bolts. Tightening or loosening the skins subtly alters the pitch of the drum sound. The stretched skin on one of the ends is thicker and produces a deep, low frequency (higher bass) sound and the other thinner one produces a higher frequency sound. Dhols with synthetic, or plastic, treble skins are very common.

The drum is played using two wooden sticks, usually made out of bamboo and cane wood. The most common rhythm played on the dhol is the Chaal, which consists of 8 beats per measure. The stick used to play the bass side of the drum is a bit thicker (roughly about 10 mm in diameter) and is bent in a quarter-circular arc on the end that strikes the drum, the dagga. The other stick is much thinner and flexible and used to play the higher note end of the drum, the thili.

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