The Splitter

Uploaded 1 Dec 2010
Spotlight This! Enter Shoot Out
Login Required

To add items to your favorites you must login.

Already have a JPG account?

Login

Need to create a JPG account?

Signup
Cancel
JPG+ Required

Collections are a JPG+ feature. You must be a JPG+ member to create new collections and to add photos to collections.

Sign up for JPG+ to start using collections now!

© Christopher Richards
Views 18
Likes 1
Favorites 0
Comments 0
Would you like to also give a props comment to the photographer?
All dislikes require a comment. Please tell us why you do not like this photo.

More of Christopher Richards's Photos

  • Desaturated Daisies
  • The Splitter
  • Ambidextrous
  • Core
Photo Info
UploadedDecember 1, 2010
TakenNovember 30, 2010
MakeNikon Corporation
ModelNIKON D5000
Exposure1/250 sec at f/4.5
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length28 mm
ISO320

Similar photos

  • The Mixer
  • The mechanism
  • Swirls
  • mechanism 2

Q: I can`t find how toFavorite someone` photo. Just the like and dislike

A: Do you know?

Latest Photo Links

Mariska Karto - Visie

Mariska Karto - Visie

366 Views  »  1 Comment  »  1 Vote

GuidePedia

GuidePedia

287 Views  »  0 Comments  »  1 Vote

Photo license: © All rights reserved

This was taken while chopping up some wood from a few recently cut down trees. The tree had been dead for quite a while, and so though the wood is still considered green and won't be good to burn until next year, the wood is dry enough to split fairly easily. As you can see, I was able to open a good crack on the first swing, and it's went through on the second.

This has been submitted to the "Tension" contest. It's a bit literal, but log splitting with an ax is an example in several principles of physics. What is keeping the blade stuck in the wood is tension applied on both sides of the metal. What makes the ax work in the first place is momentum, combined with a design that converts that force into a relatively small amount of surface area (the sharpened edge).

It's been a while, but I did like my high school physics class.

Taken with my Nikon D5000: f/4.5, 1/250 sec, iso-320

No responses

To add your comment, Log in or sign up!

Please Login or Sign Up

You must be logged in to enter photos into JPG Shoot Out contests.
Login or Sign Up