Old refinery

Uploaded 9 Jun 2013 — 1 favorite
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© Carlos Aviles
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Photo Info
UploadedJune 9, 2013
TakenJune 8, 2013
MakeFujifilm
ModelX20
Exposure1/800 sec at f/5
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length12.2 mm
ISO200
17.98981669376300 -66.71387672424300

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Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc. (CORCO) was an oil refinery established in the towns of Peñuelas and Guayanilla in Puerto Rico in the middle of the 20th century. The project started as part of Operation Bootstrap with the first unit being constructed in 1954. The company started operations in 1955 [1] and was finally incorporated on May 19, 1963. Corco represented an investment of $25 million and had the capacity to refine 23,500 barrels (3,740 m3) of oil daily. Hugo David Storer Tavarez was one of the men in charge of the CORCO being established in Puerto Rico.[2]

The refinery is located in an 800-acre (3.2 km2) site, and consists of numerous storage tanks and waste treatment units typical of petroleum refineries. CORCO has been inactive since 1982, and now functions as a terminal for the marine transportation and land-based storage of crude oil and petroleum products.

After the refinery ceased operations, an entity called Desarrollo Integral del Sur (South Integral Development) began developing a long-term plan for the reuse of the terrains and properties.[3]

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