Behind the Lines

Uploaded 4 Apr 2018 — 2 favorites
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© JamesHarmon McQuilkin
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Likes 2
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Photo Info
UploadedApril 4, 2018
TakenFebruary 25, 2018
MakeSony
ModelILCE-5000
Exposure1/160 sec at f/11
FlashRed Eye, Compulsory Flash, Return light not detected
Focal Length16 mm
ISO1000
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Photo license: © All rights reserved

The Clydesdale is a breed of draught horse named for and derived from the farm horses of Clydesdale, a county in Scotland. Although originally one of the smaller breeds of draught horses, it is now a tall breed. Often bay in color, they show significant white markings due to the presence of sabino genetics. The breed was originally used for agriculture and haulage, and is still used for draught purposes today. The Budweiser Clydesdales are some of the most famous Clydesdales, and other members of the breed are used as drum horses by the British Household Cavalry. They have also been used to create and improve other breeds.

The breed was developed from Flemish stallions imported to Scotland and crossed with local mares. The first recorded use of the name "Clydesdale" for the breed was in 1826, and by 1830 a system of hiring stallions had begun that resulted in the spread of Clydesdale horses throughout Scotland and into northern England. The first breed registry was formed in 1877. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, thousands of Clydesdales were exported from Scotland and sent throughout the world, including to Australia and New Zealand, where they became known as "the breed that built Australia". However, during World War I population numbers began to decline due to increasing mechanization and war conscription. This decline continued, and by the 1970s, the Rare Breeds Survival Trust considered the breed vulnerable to extinction. Population numbers have increased slightly in the intervening time, but they are still thought to be vulnerable.

2 responses

  • Andrea Petersen

    Andrea Petersen gave props (4 Apr 2018):

    They are a beautiful horse and enjoyed reading about them on your narrative!

  • Heather Mellon

    Heather Mellon gave props (6 Apr 2018):

    Nice see through view of this handsome Clydesdale! Your narrative is very interesting and informative. My favorite breed among the draft horses although they are all magnificent animals and deserve to be nurtured back to a secure future after all they have done for us!

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