Church of old 2

Uploaded 23 Jun 2018 — 2 favorites
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© Raje Esteban
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Photo Info
UploadedJune 23, 2018
TakenMay 24, 2018
MakeFujifilm
ModelX100T
Exposure1/320 sec at f/16
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length23 mm
ISO800
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Armenia is best known for its old monasteries. Armenians take their faith seriously. That’s why their churches and monasteries have always been defining and central institutions.

Noravank is a 13th-century Armenian monastery, located 122 km south of Yerevan in a narrow gorge made by the Amaghu River and is encircled by fabulous red rocks.

The monastery is best known for its two-storey church, which grants access to the second floor by way of a narrow stone-made staircase jutting out from the face of building. The site is comprised of three surviving churches, each decorated in varying designs.

The centuries-old Noravank is a hauntingly preserved religious complex. However it may not be standing today were it not for the ‘eyes of God’. Noravank was the only church then, which had a sculpture of Father the God on one of its walls, depicted with large almond-shaped eyes. All other Armenian churches and monasteries had sculptures which presented Christ, but not Father the God.

When the Mongols conquered Armenia in the 13th century they destroyed many of the historic temples of the country. Noravank was spared this fate. It is said that the ‘eyes of God’ seemed to calm the horde enough to leave Noravank be.

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