Faces in the Crowd

Uploaded 6 Jul 2018 — 6 favorites
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© JamesHarmon McQuilkin
Views 15
Likes 5
Favorites 6
Comments 4
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Photo Info
UploadedJuly 6, 2018
TakenJune 1, 2018
MakeSony
ModelILCE-5000
Exposure1/160 sec at f/9
FlashNo Flash
Focal Length40 mm
ISO800
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Q: I am really into my wildlife photography but cannot afford a super zoom lens, I have a 300mm and am considering a teleconvertor. Has anybody had a experience with these and would you recommend them?

A: Do you know?

Photo license: © All rights reserved

Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton.

A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon.

Although some corals are able to catch small fish and plankton using stinging cells on their tentacles, most corals obtain the majority of their energy and nutrients from photosynthetic unicellular dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium that live within their tissues. These are commonly known as zooxanthellae. Such corals require sunlight and grow in clear, shallow water, typically at depths less than 60 metres (200 ft). Corals are major contributors to the physical structure of the coral reefs that develop in tropical and subtropical waters, such as the enormous Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

Other corals do not rely on zooxanthellae and can live in much deeper water, with the cold-water genus Lophelia surviving as deep as 3,300 metres (10,800 ft).[4] Some have been found on the Darwin Mounds, north-west of Cape Wrath, Scotland, and others as far north as off the coast of Washington State and the Aleutian Islands.

4 responses

  • teresa B

    teresa B   gave props (6 Jul 2018):

    Love coral. Very pretty and great detail of the textures

  • Heather Mellon

    Heather Mellon gave props (6 Jul 2018):

    Beautiful light play on this intricate piece of coral.. great shot! Too bad so many coral beds are becoming threatened.

  • Andrea Petersen

    Andrea Petersen gave props (6 Jul 2018):

    Very beautiful shot and with an informative narrative to go with it!!!

  • Tiia Vissak

    Tiia Vissak gave props (6 Jul 2018):

    a beautiful close-up!

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