Photo Essay

Japanese Snow Monkeys Enjoy a Warm Dip to Fight Winter's Chill

Japanese Macaques have thick winter coats

Generally when one thinks of monkeys and their environment, one imagines tropical jungles, not snowy hills. This is what makes the native Japanese monkey, the macaque or "snow monkey," so unique. The Japanese macaque is the only species of monkey that lives as far north as it does. Macaques can be found in several places in Japan in environments raging from subtropical to sub-alpine. The northernmost group of Japanese macaque grow thick furry coats in winter.

In the 1970s Life magazine first featured the Japanese macaque monkey enjoying a wintry dip in a hot springs near Nagano. Thus was born the international fame of the so-called "snow monkeys" of Japan. With their thick fur coats, almost human-like faces, and their deep, soulful eyes, the snow monkeys quickly won the hearts of people worldwide.

Macaques grow to 79 to 95 cm and weigh 10 to 14 kg. The males are generally larger than the females, but females outnumber the males in their social groups. Macaques live about 30 years and reach adulthood around 3 or 5.

Macaque groups, called troops, have a strict hierarchy. An older male monkey with several male helpers rules a troop, deciding on where and when to migrate, as well as providing protection from other troops. Troops are composed of males and females of various ranks.

Males will move from troop to troop, but females will stay in their troop their whole life. Female rank is very important, as their babies will retain the hierarchical rank of their mother. Troops leaders have sometimes received their status due primarily to the position of their mother within the troop.

Monkeys hold a special place in Japanese religion and folklore. In native Shintoism monkeys are seen as the messengers of river and certain mountain gods. With the influx of Buddhism and Chinese culture, in which monkeys also had an important place, monkeys flourished, and their legends spreaded accordingly. Monkeys became demon-quellers and the protective spirits for childbirth. Their images were used for warding off evil. The famous "hear, speak, and see no evil" monkeys are believed to have originated at the Tendai Shinto Buddhist complex on Mt. Hiei, north of Kyoto. The most famous depiction of which can be seen at Toshogu Shrine in Nikko.

In areas like Nagano, where snowfall can reach record depths, the macaques seeking respite from the cold head for hot spring areas. North of Nagano city is the hot springs area of Yudanaka, which is popular with humans and simians alike. In the early 1960s a female macaque arrived here and found the hot springs to her liking. Others soon followed. A park was later created in the area where monkeys and their distant cousins humans might mingle.

Although the Monkey Park goes by the ominous-sounding name "Hell's Valley" (Jigokudani), the monkeys seem unperturbed by it as they play and bathe with reckless abandon. To them, Hell's Valley is simply heaven. At the entrance to the park is a hot springs center for humans, where they can share a bath with monkeys if they so desire. There are two outdoor baths that adventurous monkeys will wander down to in order to observe the bathing rituals of humans. For those who might be put off by monkeys gawking at them, there are indoor baths as well.

Although the snow monkeys possess such wonderful and thoughtful eyes, visitors should NOT stare directly into them. Staring is seen as an act of an aggression and a visitor looking to commune with the spirits of nature may suddenly find their nose communing with the sharp teeth of an enraged snow monkey.

The macaques of Japan number between 35,000 to 50,000. Due to destruction of their habitats and shootings by farmers, the macaque population has declined, and they are now on the endangered species list.

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Hi there!

thought you might like this story!

http://jpgmag.com/stories/10311

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3 responses

  • Lynn H

    Lynn H (Deleted) gave props (16 Jan 2009):

    Beautiful photos and informative and interesting essay! My vote :)

  • david ong

    david ong gave props (16 Jan 2009):

    this is one of the best!!! vote!

  • Amy Dunlop

    Amy Dunlop   gave props (6 Mar 2009):

    Great story and photos. Thanks for sharing.

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