Feature Story

Bathing Indian

Bathing Indian - Jug, bucket & cold well water, India - JPGmag Feature story photo
Bathing water warmed on coconut shell campfire, India - JPGmag Feature story photo
Kalyani sacred waters tank with turmeric and flower buds for bathing of Hindu Lakshmi avatars à¤à¤µ
Well jumping, village swimming pool பாà®à®©à®®à¯ à®à®´à¯à®à¯à®´à®¾à®¯à¯ நà¯à®à¯à®
Spring cleaning in Kerala - Navratri holiday, India
India, a barefoot pretty young women carry well water. Kallakurichi, Tamilnadu
Hybrid
Hindu night dipping - Konkan, MH. , India
Sea Virgins - Rajasthanis at Goa - India
Outskirts
An ant vs. Babylon tower

Stepping off the tourist 'yellow brick road' I first stood puzzled in a squat-toilet looking for the absent roll of paper. By the next evening, in a similar question-mark pose I was standing in my guest house bathroom wondering where's the hot water faucet.

Much water later I learned that most rural Indian homes have no water piping systems. Like food that is freshly made for every meal, because there are no refrigerators, water too is drawn fresh up the well for every bath.

One shower to remember: I'm standing naked in the chili fog, it's the yard of my Nepali friend. He lived on a mountain on the foothills of Himalayas. Beside me is a bucket of 'room temperature' water... it was clearly one of the quickest baths I took :)

An other one was at my Tamil friend's relative home as his whole extended family gathered there for a temple festival. The small village house could contain us for meals but not for sleeping and bathing. In the evening all men got on the few motorcycles (also Indian style: 3 riders on each 2 wheeler) and drove off to the family's sugar-cane field. We slashed through the muddy irrigation canal among the tall stems until we stepped down into the pool in front of the water pump. In pitch dark we splashed in the water laughing and enjoying.

Other more common baths I took were in Hindu temple pools (Indian bath before entering their temples) and village irrigation wells which stand among the fields and are big enough to swim around or jump in from their walls.

Elders and babies get warm water for morning baths which are often boiled over coconut shells campfire.

Here are some of the health benefits of cold showers: http://www.secrets-of-longevity-in-humans.com/cold-showers.html

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Stepping off the tourist 'yellow brick road' I first stood puzzled in a squat-toilet looking for the absent roll of paper. By the next evening, in a similar question-mark pose I was standing in my guest house bathroom wondering where's the hot water faucet.

Much water later I learned that most rural Indian homes have no water piping systems. Like food that is freshly made for every meal, because there are no refrigerators, water too is drawn fresh up the well for every bath.

One shower to remember: I'm standing naked in the chili fog, it's the yard of my Nepali friend. He lived on a mountain on the foothills of Himalayas. Beside me is a bucket of 'room temperature' water... it was clearly one of the quickest baths I took :)

An other one was at my Tamil friend's relative home as his whole extended family gathered there for a temple festival. The small village house could contain us for meals but not for sleeping and bathing. In the evening all men got on the few motorcycles (also Indian style: 3 riders on each 2 wheeler) and drove off to the family's sugar-cane field. We slashed through the muddy irrigation canal among the tall stems until we stepped down into the pool in front of the water pump. In pitch dark we splashed in the water laughing and enjoying.

Other more common baths I took were in Hindu temple pools (Indian bath before entering their temples) and village irrigation wells which stand among the fields and are big enough to swim around or jump in from their walls.

Elders and babies get warm water for morning baths which are often boiled over coconut shells campfire.

Here are some of the health benefits of cold showers: http://www.secrets-of-longevity-in-humans.com/cold-showers.html

More stories of my experiences backpacking rural India for 2 years on http://jpgmag.com/people/etand/stories

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Hi there!

thought you might like this story!

http://jpgmag.com/stories/18817

Thanks,
—The JPG team

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