The Project

Sin Blanca graphic novel

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Tempting the fray

I have always been very fascinated with the idea of creating my own comic book. All the way back to the tender years of my youth, I'd whip out a piece of paper, a pair of #2 pencils, and a ruler and get busy drawing up ridicules single page, box framed comic strip-esk stories to share with a few of my friends. The largest problem I ever encountered and it seemed to be a flaw I was never truly able to over come. I really couldn't draw all that well.

It occurred to me a few years ago, that while I still can't draw very well, I have gotten pretty good at post processing photography in ways that fell outside of what is considered normal. That part of me that loves telling stories and creating science fiction/fantasy worlds is still very much alive. I thought to myself one day, 'if can't draw a graphic story, I'm going to shoot one'. Sin Blanca was born.

From conception to finished product, the entire project took a little over a year to complete. First a story had to be created and written. In the case of Sin Blanca, I branched off of an exciting story I've been working on, and created something of a prequel. To create a story, I first had to consider what I thought I could and could not create with a processed photograph. This in its own way forced me to think within the boundaries of a metaphorical box. I obviously couldn't make a ten story building explode in the middle of down town Idaho Falls, but there were still plenty of things I felt like I could do. Really, I was limited only by what I thought I could create, and as the project evolved I slowly realized I was actually capable of much more then I'd originally thought.

Before any shooting on the actual graphic novel began, I'd first spent a good number of hours modeling myself in a series of concept shoots. This gave me the chance to explore the boundaries of that proverbial 'box'. Props and costumes either had to be made, barrowed or purchased. Shooting locations had to be scoped out, and selected. And of course, casting calls had to go out. As luck would have it, I had more then enough friends and family eager to participate.

Even working within an extremely small budget, both financially and time wise, the actual shooting period last just over three months. All together there were eight different shooting locations, and much like making a movie the project was not shot in sequence. Largely depending on which actors were available, shoots jumped around within the script. Curiously enough, the last shot of the graphic novel was in fact the last shot of the project. If I recall correctly, I believe there were only six days of actual shooting total. Depending on the scale of the shoot, and the effects I'd intended to use, the most time consuming part of creating each scene fell into the post processing.

I don't know that anything like this has ever been tried before, but I highly encourage others to give it a shot. It's well worth the time and effort. A labor of love, the effort was more then just slightly rewarding, and I've actually considered attempting a second issue.

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Hi there!

thought you might like this story!

http://jpgmag.com/stories/19158

Thanks,
—The JPG team

6 responses

  • kil roy metters

    kil roy metters   gave props (8 Jan 2013):

    congrats on your achievement

  • JPG

    JPG gave props (13 Jan 2013):

    Congrats on getting the story of the week!

  • Carol Arntsen Masiak

    Carol Arntsen Masiak gave props (13 Jan 2013):

    congrats on story of the week - voted!

  • Toby Morrison

    Toby Morrison   gave props (14 Jan 2013):

    Love this concept. Well done!

  • John Linton

    John Linton gave props (17 Jan 2013):

    Hell YEAH! Rad!

  • John Linton

    John Linton gave props (17 Jan 2013):

    Congrats on making Story of the Week!

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